The Holy Guests of Sukkot

According to the Zohar, we are visited by spiritual guests during the festival of Sukkot, known as Ushpizin. The Ushpizin guests number seven and they are; Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and King David. The Lubavitcher Rebbe taught that there are also seven Hassidic Ushpizin that accompany these seven spiritual guests and they are; the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid of Mezritch, the Alter Rebbe, the Mitteler Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, the Rebbe Maharash and the Rebbe Rashab. Although all of these guests visit our Sukkot on each day of the festival, each day is known to have it’s own special guests. Continue reading

Shabbat Candles FAQ

Q: How do Shabbat Candles bring peace into a Jewish home?

A: According to the Talmud, due to the fact that a poorly-lit room can lead to people tripping up and bickering as a result, Shabbat Candles bring light and as a result tranquility in to the Jewish home. The warm glow of the candles also brings a festive atmosphere in to the house. Continue reading

All About the Day Before Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashana ShofarRosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year and lasts for two days, falling at the beginning of the Jewish month of Tishrei. The festival is already in the conscience of Jewish people from the preceding month of Elul which is a time of preparation for the upcoming solemn days of Rosh Hashanah. The day before Rosh Hashanah often goes unnoticed but it has its own interesting prayers and customs and it is a shame to not pay attention to it Continue reading

All you need to know about Bar Mitzvah

What does the phrase Bar Mitzvah mean?

Bar Mitzvah means “Son of Commandment” and refers to the fact that when a Jewish boy reaches the age of thirteen he becomes accountable for his actions in Jewish law. A Jewish boy automatically becomes Bar Mitzvah at the age of thirteen whether or not he celebrated or commemorated the occasion. Continue reading

Tzedakah Boxes in Jewish History

What are Tzedakah Boxes?

Tzedakah Boxes are commonly translated as Charity Boxes. First of all, that is a Jewish tzedakah boxmistranslation, an understandable one but still incorrect. The root of the Hebrew word Tzedakah is Tzedek meaning Justice. Judaism views giving to those who are less fortunate than you as a form of justice, not an act of charity. Charity denotes a generous action done out of the kindness of one’s heart. Continue reading

What Says Thank-You for a Shabbat Invite in the Best Way?

You’ve been invited out for a meal or two or even an entire Shabbat, Friday is drawing nearer and you suddenly realize that you have nothing to bring your hosts- what to do?! We recommend stocking up on a bunch of beautiful Judaica gifts which you can then whip Shabbat Candlesticksout at your convenience. That way you’ll never have that last minute rush before Shabbat which usually ends in buying something over-priced, totally useless that screams last-minute.com. No, a bunch of withered flowers, calorific-laden desserts and boring bottles of wine don’t exactly broadcast originality. Continue reading

A Historical Look at Fashion Jewelry

Fashion Jewelry is also known as costume jewelry and is a popular form of jewelry around Fashion Jewelrythe world.  Fashion Jewelry is made to complement a particular costume or garment and came into being in the 1930s, intended to be a cheap way of dressing up clothes and to be fashionable for a short period of time, outdate itself and then be repurchased to fit a new fashion style. Fashion Jewelry is mainly used in fashion, unlike fine jewelry which is regarded as collectibles, keepsakes or investments.  For these reasons, Fashion Jewelry is generally made of less valuable materials.

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Seven Species of Israel Products

“A land of wheat and barley and grapes and figs and pomegranates, and land of olive oil and dates.”

Seven agricultural products are listed in the Bible as being special to the Land of Israel. Although these species no longer dominate the diet of people living in Israel these species still characterize the local landscape and are widely used in the Israeli diet. In biblical times the species were the staple foods consumed by the people in the land. In modern times only wheat is a staple but the fact that these species continue to dominate the landscape accentuates a sense of continuity between Biblical Israel and Modern Israel. Continue reading